Tagged with Photography RSS

reportagebygettyimages:

The New York Times Lens blog profiles the work of Shannon Jensen, who visited South Sudan’s Blue Nile region to photograph an underreported refugee crisis. After making standard documentary images that garnered little interest from international publications, she tried to find a different visual approach to telling the story.

While looking at her images on her laptop she stopped at an image of three refugees carrying their shoes. She had “a gut feeling” that the shoes could be an effective way to tell the story. As refugees arrived she had noticed the state of their shoes, the care they took in repairing them and how much the refugees seemed to treasure them.

I think they started off as protection for their feet, but even when the shoes were so worn down that they weren’t comfortable to walk in, and seemed unrepairable, people were loath to discard one of the few things they owned.

She began photographing shoes. Hundreds of them.

Read more on Lens, and see more of Shannon’s work on the Reportage Web site.

This body of work is also among those featured in Moving Walls 21 by the Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project, which is open free-of-charge to the public from January 29 to October 3 in New York City.

The conflict in South Sudan is forcing thousands of families to flee their homes and seek safety from marauding fighters each day. Despite threats and looting, our teams continue working in close coordination with partners to meet the urgent needs of those displaced.

At one of the makeshift camps at U.N. bases in the capital of Juba, we brought more supplies like blankets, soap and cooking tools to families last Thursday. See more photos.

Photos: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps

We rely on beautiful images to tell the stories of the people around the world we work so hard to help, and to share the incredible impact of your support. Mercy Corps’ Photography Specialist Phil Ottum had this to say about this photo from Haiti that he included in 2013’s ten best images:

"Sometimes contrasting elements provide visual interest. Here a Haitian man’s strong, rough, and muddied hands play against the fragile sapling he’s carefully holding."

See the rest of this year’s best photos.
Photo: Nancy R. Farese for Mercy Corps

We rely on beautiful images to tell the stories of the people around the world we work so hard to help, and to share the incredible impact of your support. Mercy Corps’ Photography Specialist Phil Ottum had this to say about this photo from Haiti that he included in 2013’s ten best images:

"Sometimes contrasting elements provide visual interest. Here a Haitian man’s strong, rough, and muddied hands play against the fragile sapling he’s carefully holding."

See the rest of this year’s best photos.

Photo: Nancy R. Farese for Mercy Corps

We rely on beautiful photos like this one from Sumaya Agha to show the incredible impact of your support. See the other images that made our list of the Ten Best Photos of 2013. 

We rely on beautiful photos like this one from Sumaya Agha to show the incredible impact of your support. See the other images that made our list of the Ten Best Photos of 2013. 

From the Mercy Corps family to yours, we wish you a holiday filled with love, peace, and light.
Mercy Corps team member Kyla Yeoman captured this shot of girls on their way to school in Uganda. See the rest of Mercy Corps’ best photos of 2013.

From the Mercy Corps family to yours, we wish you a holiday filled with love, peace, and light.

Mercy Corps team member Kyla Yeoman captured this shot of girls on their way to school in Uganda. See the rest of Mercy Corps’ best photos of 2013.

At Mercy Corps, we rely on beautiful images to tell the stories of the people around the world we work so hard to help, and to share the incredible impact of your support.At the end of each year our photography specialist selects ten photographs that he won’t soon forget. See them all.Photo: Mathieu Rouquette/Mercy Corps

At Mercy Corps, we rely on beautiful images to tell the stories of the people around the world we work so hard to help, and to share the incredible impact of your support.

At the end of each year our photography specialist selects ten photographs that he won’t soon forget. See them all.

Photo: Mathieu Rouquette/Mercy Corps

Fadi Kaheel, 11, is one of many Syrian refugee children who participated in a recent photography workshop in Lebanon, part of our Moving Forward program there.
The goal is to help young Syrian refugees — most of whom feel scared and isolated — integrate into their new community and develop self-esteem, teamwork and coping skills by participating with Lebanese kids in sports, support groups, and creative projects like theater, filmmaking and photojournalism.
For Fadi, the photography workshop also meant making new friends and gaining a deeper understanding of his host community in Lebanon. Read more about his story and see some of his photographs from the workshop.
Photo:Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Fadi Kaheel, 11, is one of many Syrian refugee children who participated in a recent photography workshop in Lebanon, part of our Moving Forward program there.

The goal is to help young Syrian refugees — most of whom feel scared and isolated — integrate into their new community and develop self-esteem, teamwork and coping skills by participating with Lebanese kids in sports, support groups, and creative projects like theater, filmmaking and photojournalism.

For Fadi, the photography workshop also meant making new friends and gaining a deeper understanding of his host community in Lebanon. Read more about his story and see some of his photographs from the workshop.

Photo:Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

We were so impressed by the submissions to our photo contest that we can’t help but share more of them. Thank you to everyone who participated — we’re truly moved by the moments you shared with us.

See more of your stunning submissions.

Photo credits from top to bottom: Michael Stoebner, Sean Sheridan, Motaz Ibrahim Al Araj

We asked you to show us your best photo showing what unites us as humankind. Hundreds of you submitted stunning, moving photos. It wasn’t easy, but we narrowed the field to three finalists, and invited our community of supporters to vote for their favorite.
Sergio Fernando Ribero Mendizabal submitted the winning photograph, of a boy in Bolivia. His photo will be included in our 2014 Mercy Corps Calendar — and he’ll get a portfolio review from Getty Images!
Congratulations to Sergio Fernando Ribero Mendizabal — and thank you to all who participated!

We asked you to show us your best photo showing what unites us as humankind. Hundreds of you submitted stunning, moving photos. It wasn’t easy, but we narrowed the field to three finalists, and invited our community of supporters to vote for their favorite.

Sergio Fernando Ribero Mendizabal submitted the winning photograph, of a boy in Bolivia. His photo will be included in our 2014 Mercy Corps Calendar — and he’ll get a portfolio review from Getty Images!

Congratulations to Sergio Fernando Ribero Mendizabal — and thank you to all who participated!

We asked you to share your photos that capture what connects us as humankind, and we are so moved by your submissions. Narrowing the field down to three finalists wasn’t easy.

Now it’s up to you to make the final decision. Cast your vote!

Mercy Corps is a leading global humanitarian agency saving and improving lives in the world’s toughest places.