Many children like this little girl in the Democratic Republic of Congo have never known a permanent home.
Conflict here is chronic and unpredictable. When fighting breaks out, families move their few belongings from camp to camp and set up makeshift shelters on the bare lava rock.
Mercy Corps has been working to meet the immediate needs of displaced families in DRC since 2007. We’ve distributed emergency food and other supplies, but our main focus is on getting enough clean water to camps and the city of Goma. New reservoirs and pumps are delivering clean drinking water, while more latrines and handwashing stations are preventing disease.
Photo by Gerry Ellis for Mercy Corps

Many children like this little girl in the Democratic Republic of Congo have never known a permanent home.

Conflict here is chronic and unpredictable. When fighting breaks out, families move their few belongings from camp to camp and set up makeshift shelters on the bare lava rock.

Mercy Corps has been working to meet the immediate needs of displaced families in DRC since 2007. We’ve distributed emergency food and other supplies, but our main focus is on getting enough clean water to camps and the city of Goma. New reservoirs and pumps are delivering clean drinking water, while more latrines and handwashing stations are preventing disease.

Photo by Gerry Ellis for Mercy Corps

While there’s no panacea to the DR Congo’s myriad of problems, only a sustained focus on long-term development will break the cycle of conflict and poverty. Current humanitarian interventions are critical, but even in the current hostilities, development agencies, donors and governments must find ways to lay the foundation for lasting change. Let us not turn our backs on DR Congo at such a critical moment.
Simon O’Connell, Mercy Corps’ Regional Program Director for Africa. Read the rest of Simon’s piece.
Mercy Corps is ramping up efforts to get more water to families who continue fleeing the volatile situation in Goma. Teams are focused on maintaining sanitation and increasing the water capacity at Mugunga 3 camp, where the population has ballooned from 60,000 to nearly 100,000 people.
Read more.
Photo: Reuters/James Akena, courtesy Thomson Reuters Foundation - AlertNet

Mercy Corps is ramping up efforts to get more water to families who continue fleeing the volatile situation in Goma. Teams are focused on maintaining sanitation and increasing the water capacity at Mugunga 3 camp, where the population has ballooned from 60,000 to nearly 100,000 people.

Read more.

Photo: Reuters/James Akena, courtesy Thomson Reuters Foundation - AlertNet

Preventing cholera is our absolute number-one priority. In some areas right now there are over 200 people for every one latrine, and 700 people sharing a single hand-washing station. The combination of poor sanitation like this and a shortage of clean water makes water-borne disease a very real threat.

We have the chance to make a real difference here and prevent a very serious situation from becoming worse. We’re throwing everything we have at it.

Mark Dwyer, our Democratic Republic of Congo Country Director. Mercy Corps is working around the clock to provide aid and prevent a cholera outbreak among thousands of people who have fled their homes to escape the recent conflict.
The recent battle for Goma between Congolese forces and M23 rebels forced a large concentration of internally displaced people to flee west of the city. It also severed the city’s electricity supply, idling the machinery that pumps water to most of the city’s population.
Mercy Corps is supplying the camps with additional generator fuel, chlorine to purify the water, and supplies to build additional latrines and hand-washing stations. In the photo above, Mercy Corps’ Senior Tech Advisor Albert Reichert is working to get clean water into a displacement camp.
Read more.

The recent battle for Goma between Congolese forces and M23 rebels forced a large concentration of internally displaced people to flee west of the city. It also severed the city’s electricity supply, idling the machinery that pumps water to most of the city’s population.

Mercy Corps is supplying the camps with additional generator fuel, chlorine to purify the water, and supplies to build additional latrines and hand-washing stations. In the photo above, Mercy Corps’ Senior Tech Advisor Albert Reichert is working to get clean water into a displacement camp.

Read more.

We are monitoring humanitarian needs in eastern Congo, where rebel forces have taken control of Goma, the capital of Congo’s war-torn North Kivu province.
Mercy Corps has been working from Goma since 2007 to support vulnerable families by promoting sustainable livelihoods, food security, and good governance. We’ve been working with partners to rehabilitate Goma’s municipal water network since 2008, and working throughout the province to provide access to water and sanitation services in displacement camps.
Read more. 
Photo: REUTERS/Jonny Hogg, courtesy Trust.org - AlertNet

We are monitoring humanitarian needs in eastern Congo, where rebel forces have taken control of Goma, the capital of Congo’s war-torn North Kivu province.

Mercy Corps has been working from Goma since 2007 to support vulnerable families by promoting sustainable livelihoods, food security, and good governance. We’ve been working with partners to rehabilitate Goma’s municipal water network since 2008, and working throughout the province to provide access to water and sanitation services in displacement camps.

Read more.

Photo: REUTERS/Jonny Hogg, courtesy Trust.org - AlertNet