Our own Liz Hummer is visiting Mercy Corps’ programs in Niger, and shared this photo:

"How many of you want to go to school?" That was the question we asked this portion of another teen girls group yesterday, some of whom are already married, all of whom are told they have to work at home instead of get an education - and all of whom want that to be different. Mercy Corps is working to change the beliefs that prevent these girls from staying in school.

reportagebygettyimages

reportagebygettyimages:

The New York Times Lens blog profiles the work of Shannon Jensen, who visited South Sudan’s Blue Nile region to photograph an underreported refugee crisis. After making standard documentary images that garnered little interest from international publications, she tried to find a different visual approach to telling the story.

While looking at her images on her laptop she stopped at an image of three refugees carrying their shoes. She had “a gut feeling” that the shoes could be an effective way to tell the story. As refugees arrived she had noticed the state of their shoes, the care they took in repairing them and how much the refugees seemed to treasure them.

I think they started off as protection for their feet, but even when the shoes were so worn down that they weren’t comfortable to walk in, and seemed unrepairable, people were loath to discard one of the few things they owned.

She began photographing shoes. Hundreds of them.

Read more on Lens, and see more of Shannon’s work on the Reportage Web site.

This body of work is also among those featured in Moving Walls 21 by the Open Society Foundations Documentary Photography Project, which is open free-of-charge to the public from January 29 to October 3 in New York City.

unicef
unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Adamou (age 10) 
Central African Republic: Adamou Bouba sustained a machete injury when his home was attacked by an armed group. His father and an older brother were killed. To survive, Adamou fled with his mother and 13-year-old brother to the bush, where they remained for several weeks before joining other internally displaced people living in the Bossangoa camp. By mid-January 2014, some 886,000 people across the country remained uprooted by renewed violence.
©UNICEF/Gabrielle Menezes

unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Adamou (age 10) 

Central African Republic: Adamou Bouba sustained a machete injury when his home was attacked by an armed group. His father and an older brother were killed. To survive, Adamou fled with his mother and 13-year-old brother to the bush, where they remained for several weeks before joining other internally displaced people living in the Bossangoa camp. By mid-January 2014, some 886,000 people across the country remained uprooted by renewed violence.

©UNICEF/Gabrielle Menezes

The conflict in South Sudan is forcing thousands of families to flee their homes and seek safety from marauding fighters each day. Despite threats and looting, our teams continue working in close coordination with partners to meet the urgent needs of those displaced.

At one of the makeshift camps at U.N. bases in the capital of Juba, we brought more supplies like blankets, soap and cooking tools to families last Thursday. See more photos.

Photos: Camille Lepage for Mercy Corps

fotojournalismus
fotojournalismus:

Displaced South Sudanese women sit at dawn in the grounds of St. Theresa’s cathedral in Juba, on January 13, 2014. About 32,000 refugees have fled to Uganda and a total of around 10,000 others have gone to Ethiopia and Kenya, while more than 350,000 are internally displaced within South Sudan, the United Nations says. (Phil Moore/AFP)
(via afp-photo)

fotojournalismus:

Displaced South Sudanese women sit at dawn in the grounds of St. Theresa’s cathedral in Juba, on January 13, 2014. About 32,000 refugees have fled to Uganda and a total of around 10,000 others have gone to Ethiopia and Kenya, while more than 350,000 are internally displaced within South Sudan, the United Nations says. (Phil Moore/AFP)

(via afp-photo)

It’s been almost a year since the Seleka rebel coalition staged an armed coup that threw the Central African Republic into chaos. Nearly one million people are now displaced and the U.N. estimates that 2.3 million people are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance — over half of the country’s population.
Mercy Corps is actively helping families affected by the deepening crisis. For the past month, we’ve focused our emergency response on strategic towns in both the east and west of the country, along with the capital of Bangui, where violence has rapidly escalated since early December.
Read more.
Photo: Sean Sheridan for Mercy Corps

It’s been almost a year since the Seleka rebel coalition staged an armed coup that threw the Central African Republic into chaos. Nearly one million people are now displaced and the U.N. estimates that 2.3 million people are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance — over half of the country’s population.

Mercy Corps is actively helping families affected by the deepening crisis. For the past month, we’ve focused our emergency response on strategic towns in both the east and west of the country, along with the capital of Bangui, where violence has rapidly escalated since early December.

Read more.

Photo: Sean Sheridan for Mercy Corps

Reports estimate that 189,000 people have been displaced since violent conflict broke out in South Sudan on December 15. 
Mercy Corps has expanded emergency response work to the northern border town of Bentiu, where 8,000 people are sheltering at the U.N. base, seeking refuge from escalating violence.
We were among the first responders when fighting broke out in the capital of Juba, South Sudan last month, and our team has been on the ground since helping thousands of struggling families.
Read more.
Photo: Mathieu Rouquette/Mercy Corps

Reports estimate that 189,000 people have been displaced since violent conflict broke out in South Sudan on December 15. 

Mercy Corps has expanded emergency response work to the northern border town of Bentiu, where 8,000 people are sheltering at the U.N. base, seeking refuge from escalating violence.

We were among the first responders when fighting broke out in the capital of Juba, South Sudan last month, and our team has been on the ground since helping thousands of struggling families.

Read more.

Photo: Mathieu Rouquette/Mercy Corps

The Central African Republic (CAR), one of the world’s poorest countries, has been described by the United Nations High Commissioner as “the most neglected crisis in the world.”
Plagued by poor governance and corruption, CAR has been trapped in a cycle of conflict and underdevelopment for years. Most Central Africans live hand to mouth and find it extremely difficult to amass assets or plan for long-term economic activities. 
We’ve been working in CAR since 2007, addressing the growing needs of people affected by both conflict and poverty. In response to the enduring violence there, we’ve focused on programs to help victims of assault — especially women and children — access medical and legal services. We also distribute emergency cash to displaced families to buy food and essential items like cooking supplies and shelter materials.
Read more.
Photo: Sean Sheridan for Mercy Corps

The Central African Republic (CAR), one of the world’s poorest countries, has been described by the United Nations High Commissioner as “the most neglected crisis in the world.”

Plagued by poor governance and corruption, CAR has been trapped in a cycle of conflict and underdevelopment for years. Most Central Africans live hand to mouth and find it extremely difficult to amass assets or plan for long-term economic activities. 

We’ve been working in CAR since 2007, addressing the growing needs of people affected by both conflict and poverty. In response to the enduring violence there, we’ve focused on programs to help victims of assault — especially women and children — access medical and legal services. We also distribute emergency cash to displaced families to buy food and essential items like cooking supplies and shelter materials.

Read more.

Photo: Sean Sheridan for Mercy Corps