When families are forced to use all their resources just to put food on the table, they’re unable to contribute to the things that make them more resilient to poverty and hunger, like expanding their livelihoods or educating their children.

As a widow in a poor village in Yemen, one of the most food insecure countries in the world, Ayesha struggled to provide for her nine children. But through our emergency food program, she was able to feed her family and regain hope for their future. See her story in photos.

Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Today on World Water Day, we’re remembering the 768 million people who don’t have access to clean water — including more than 2.5 million Syrian refugees. 
Across the globe, these families struggle every day to find safe drinking water. Often, all that’s available is unsanitary and risks disease, but they have no choice — their lives depend on it.
You can take just a moment today to stand up for these families. Sign the petition and tell Congress that every person deserves clean water. Support the Water for the World Act.

Today on World Water Day, we’re remembering the 768 million people who don’t have access to clean water — including more than 2.5 million Syrian refugees. 

Across the globe, these families struggle every day to find safe drinking water. Often, all that’s available is unsanitary and risks disease, but they have no choice — their lives depend on it.

You can take just a moment today to stand up for these families. Sign the petition and tell Congress that every person deserves clean water. Support the Water for the World Act.

Our own Nigel Pont joined today’s episode of the radio show “On Point” to discuss the meager conditions faced by the youngest Syrian refugees in Lebanon and other neighboring countries. According to Pont, everywhere you look, you can see the daily impact that displacement is having on an entire generation. Listen to the show and learn more about the cost of war on Syrian refugee children.
Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Our own Nigel Pont joined today’s episode of the radio show “On Point” to discuss the meager conditions faced by the youngest Syrian refugees in Lebanon and other neighboring countries. 

According to Pont, everywhere you look, you can see the daily impact that displacement is having on an entire generation. 

Listen to the show and learn more about the cost of war on Syrian refugee children.

Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

The New York Times examines the scale of destruction inside Syria and talks to Mercy Corps and aid organizations in the region about the massive humanitarian needs. How you can help.

Today marks three years since the conflict in Syria began. 
A few months after the March 2011 nonviolent uprisings, people started looking for safer places away from escalating fighting. Three years later, the stream of refugees has become the largest in the world — more than 2.5 million Syrians have fled the full blown civil war that is tearing their country apart, with no idea when they can return home.
Stand #withsyria today. Get the facts and learn how to help.

Today marks three years since the conflict in Syria began. 

A few months after the March 2011 nonviolent uprisings, people started looking for safer places away from escalating fighting. Three years later, the stream of refugees has become the largest in the world — more than 2.5 million Syrians have fled the full blown civil war that is tearing their country apart, with no idea when they can return home.

Stand #withsyria today. Get the facts and learn how to help.

What is life like as a refugee? From dawn until dusk, every hour with Nour, 13, and her family shows the hardships they and millions of Syrian refugees endure every day, three years since the war began — and the occasional joys they hang on to far from home.

See photos and share a typical Friday with Nour in Jordan’s Zaatari camp, which she and her family have called home since fleeing Syria last year. 

Photos: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps

Razan, 9, fled Syria 18 months ago. “I miss my home, friends and school. I’m afraid of the dogs here, and I don’t like the darkness. It gets really dark here at night. I like the playground because it reminds me of Syria. We had a nice playground in Syria.” 
In their own words, young people in Zaatari refugee camp tell us what it’s like to grow up without their home and what keeps them looking forward. Read their stories.
Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps 

Razan, 9, fled Syria 18 months ago. “I miss my home, friends and school. I’m afraid of the dogs here, and I don’t like the darkness. It gets really dark here at night. I like the playground because it reminds me of Syria. We had a nice playground in Syria.”

In their own words, young people in Zaatari refugee camp tell us what it’s like to grow up without their home and what keeps them looking forward. Read their stories.

Photo: Cassandra Nelson/Mercy Corps